Baptism

Baptism is the first and initiating sacrament of the Church. Infants are baptized shortly after they are born. Adults who convert to Catholism are baptized as they enter the church. 

Infant Baptism:

In the Catholic Church today, baptism is most commonly administered to infants. While some other Christians strenuously object to infant baptism, believing that baptism requires assent on the part of the person being baptized, the Eastern Orthodox, Anglicans, Lutherans, and other mainline Protestants also practice infant baptism, and there is evidence that it was practiced from the earliest days of the Church. 

Since baptism removes both the guilt and the punishment due to Original Sin, delaying baptism until a child can understand the sacrament may put the child's salvation in danger, should he die unbaptized. 

Preparation prior to the sacrament of Baptism is required and parents should contact the Parish office for details.

Adult Baptism:

Adult converts to Catholicism also receive the sacrament, unless they have already received a Christian baptism. While an adult can be baptized after proper instruction in the Faith, adult baptism normally occurs today as part of the Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults (RCIA) and is immediately followed by Confirmation and Communion.